12 Goddesses to Honor for Ostara, the Spring Equinox

Ostara is just hours away, and this will be the first sacred day I’ve fully observed in quite a while! My pregnancy had me exhausted, so beyond a little home decoration at Samhain, Yule, and Imbolc, I’ve done nothing else since last July. Most years I chose to welcome Persephone back to this realm at the spring equinox, but this year I wanted to explore something new. I’ll be making an offering to a goddess I’ve never honored before. Who? Don’t know yet, but I’ve got a little time left to come up with something! Now that I’ve transitioned into motherhood I want to open up relationships with more mother goddesses who can, I hope, teach me to be a better parent.

While exploring options for myself, I wanted to share twelve goddesses who are wonderful options for beginner pagans, baby witches, or anyone looking to greet someone new. This list is, of course, not exhaustive. There are many dozens of goddesses from a variety of pantheons one would do well to honor for Ostara. But this list might offer the right amount of inspiration and direction for you as you craft your rituals.

Persephone
Greek. Also known as Kore or Propserina to the Romans, she is the spring maiden and daughter of Demeter. Together they are the central figures of the Eleusinian mysteries. Persephone is the embodiment of youth, abundance, and growth; but she is also the keeper of souls in the Underworld as a dark maiden, where she spends four months of the year with her consort Hades. Though young, she’s skilled in magick, divination, and wise in the philosophies of life and death.

Associations: Pomegranates, earth, red, pink, rose quartz, black tourmaline, seeds, mint, crowns, torches, deer.

Branwen
Welsh. One of the many Celtic goddesses of sovereignty, Branwen is a daughter of the sea and spring. Married to an abusive husband, she ultimately died of a broken heart when her loved ones perished in their attempts to rescue her. She is thus associated with freedom and new beginnings, especially for people seeking to break free of cruel relationships or failed marriages, and can offer a spiritual home for those feeling trapped. Birds represent her, especially starlings. Her name may in fact translate to “white raven.”

Associations: Cups, cauldrons, starlings, birds, aquamarine, rose quartz, standing stones, blossoms, white.

Anath
Canaanite/Mesopotamian. Also written as Anat or Anatu, Anath is a warrior, lover, and virgin often depicted riding a lion with flowers in her fists. She appears in many forms across Mesopotamia and Egypt, but her character as a warrior remains the same. She is as sensual as she is ferocious, a dedicated lover who can bring the dead back to life. She was celebrated at spring and harvest festivals in recognition of her role in fertility of women and the land.

Associations: Weapons, especially bow and arrows, axes, and clubs; flowers, lions, sashes, red, green, calves, sunstone, copper, iron, Mars.

Demeter
Greek. Mother of Persephone, goddess of grains, parenting, and grief. Though more often associated with the harvest, Demeter teaches the acts of both sowing and reaping, making her guidance at Ostara worthwhile for those looking to pursue goals over the Wheel of the Year. She is central to a many myths, mysteries, and forms in the ancient world, making her a deeply complex goddess of both underworld and agrarian magicks. She suffered over the loss of Persephone to the Underworld, symbolized by the loss of vegetation in the barren winter months, making her an excellent teacher of patience, dealing with loss, and finding hope for renewal in the spring.

Associations: Cornucopias, wheat, bread, torches, grain, sheep, flowers, poppies and opium, fruit such as apples, Virgo, horses, green, black.

Juno
Roman. Though she has a reputation for civilized wisdom and counsel, Juno is also a guide for adolescents going through puberty and adults looking for a special someone. For those looking for love in the spring, Juno’s rulership of femininity and romantic bonds is perfect for attracting romance this season. She is symbolized by peacocks, famous for their courting feathers, and guides young women into their adulthood while promising the perfect match at the right time. Her sacred month is June when spring transitions to summer. As a queen, she is decisive and can be unforgiving in her verdicts. As a goddess of marriage, she deeply values fidelity.

Associations: Earth, air, gold, blue, green, wedding rings, thrones, diadems, the Moon, peacocks, books and scholarship

Aurora
Roman. Like the Aurora Borealis that bears her name, Aurora is the goddess of extravagant light and the dawn. She opens the gates of heaven and offers renewal to the masses. As spring marks the beginning of a new agricultural year, Aurora is the perfect goddess for anyone looking to start afresh or embark on a new path. The mother of the constellations and their light, the four winds are also her children.

Associations: Chariots, saffron, poetry (especially erotic and love poems), cicadas, air, water, stars and constellations, all colors and rainbows

Eostre, or Ostara
Germanic/Saxon. The goddess of spring from whom the holiday Ostara takes its name, Eostre’s very name means “spring.” Depicted as a young woman bearing fertility, she was celebrated with painted eggs and sweet foods that are now found in the Christianized version of the holiday as Easter.

Associations: Hares and rabbits, all colors and rainbows, eggs, dawn, quartz, opal, opalite, wildflowers, meadows

Bast
Egyptian. Before she was symbolized by the domestic cat, Bast was a lioness who ruled the fertile power of the sun’s rays on the land. Protector of children and women, Bast grew from a ferocious warrior of anointing into a goddess who also embodied sensuality and love. As a guardian of the home, she is the perfect companion for a deep spring cleaning – both physical and etheric – and will encourage tidiness throughout the season. Honor her with perfumes from flowers, gold, singing, sex, and feasting.

Associations: Red, green, gold, silver, perfumes, incense, domestic cats, lions, sistrum and music, weapons, beer, carnelian, lapis lazuli, the Sun and the Moon

Atargatis
Phoenician/Syrian. Also spelled Ataratheh, she was protectress of the city Hierapolis near modern Aleppo in northern Syria. Known as the mermaid goddess due to her association with iconography found at Ascalon, Atargatis is a teacher of the advancements that come with civilization: improved agricultural and food systems, social structures and contracts, and inventions. Herself a force of nature, she brings fertility, moisture, and abundance. As vegetation returns with the spring, so do her blessings.

Associations: Doves, fish, whales, seashells, salt water, sand, lions, the crescent moon, red, blue, green, veils, scepters, eggs

Pomona
Roman. Pomona is one of many agricultural goddesses in the Roman pantheon. She offers fertility to orchards, nut and fruit trees. Apples are particularly sacred to her. The ideal goddess for the springtime gardener, she teaches proper care and communication with fruiting and blossoming plants. Pomona is also considered a wood nymph rather than a goddess, and is associated with Demeter in the Greek pantheon.

Associations: Pruning knife, cornucopia, fruits, fruit platters, blossoms, groves and orchards, nuts, green, orange, red, moss agate, fairy stone, malachite.

Idunn
Norse. A great healer and the bestower of immortality, Idunn is the keeper of apples that offer eternal youth and it is she who sustains the everlasting life of the gods. Goddess of youth, she lends her strength to the sick and rules the springtime.

Associations: Fae magick, apples, natural springs, green, red, water, earth, herbal medicine, apples.

Yaoji
Chinese. For the outdoorsy and green-thumb pagans, Yaoji offers lessons in herblore, magical brews, and navigating the wilderness of the mountains. If you’re hoping to spend more time this spring in wildlife reserves and parklands, Yaoji can help you learn to identify herbs, fungi, stones, and other natural artefacts on your hiking trails. Her specialty is the love potion.

Associations: Wild herbs, mountains, waterfalls, mist, fog, cauldrons, axes, dusk, dreamwork, visions, red, green, jade, quartz, rain.

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